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Improving Egypt-Russia Relations A Big Setback For Saudi Arabia

By Dr. Sawraj Singh

Egypt is reviving its traditional close relations with Russia. After the downfall of Morsi, Egypt is quickly improving its relations with Russia. Saudi Arabia, which was considered the closest American ally amongst the Arabs, has lost its leading status not only in the Arab world, but in the Muslim world at large. Many Arabs and Muslims started resenting the oil-rich kingdom’s arrogant and hegemonic attitude. Saudi Arabia led the Arab world on a reckless course settling scores with its rivals such as Saddam Hussein, Gaddafi, and Assad.

Saudi Arabia’s rash foreign policy and oppressive internal system, particularly for foreigners, pushed the Middle East into a severe and extremely dangerous crisis. Syria proved to be the last straw which broke the camel’s back. Not only Saudi Arabia’s enemies, but its friends also decided that they had enough of oil money’s stubbornness and arrogance. America seems to have decided finally that Saudi Arabia has become more of a liability than an asset. It is finding alternatives to the Saudis’ friendship and is reconsidering its Middle Eastern policies, including working something out with Iran.

The Middle East countries feel that the one-sided American presence has pushed the Middle East to an extremely serious situation which can lead to an almost complete destruction of the region and total chaos. To restore balance in the region, they have invited Russia to come back to the region. Egypt has started reviving its traditional friendship and very close relations with Russia. Russia, which emerged a clear winner in Syria, has significantly enhanced its position and status in the Middle East and the world. Russia is seen as a peacemaker and a stabilizer in the Middle East. For example, Russia is helping to improve Muslim-Christian relations in Egypt, which were very severely strained by Morsi’s followers.

Saudis are now facing the results of their foreign and domestic policies. They seem to have completely lost their leading status as the leading Arab country to Egypt, which has always been considered the leading Arab country. Egypt, under Nasser, became not only the leading Arab country to resist western domination, but was among the leading countries which started the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM). Then, Anwar Sadat capitulated to the West and Egypt lost its status in the Arab world as well as in the world at large. Many Arabs and Muslims all over the world consider Sadat a traitor and a sell-out. Sadat finally paid the price for his treachery and betrayal.

Saudis were the product of the unipolar world which evolved after the collapse of the Soviet Union. The West started promoting dogmatic extremists among these Muslims to counter the more secular and sane elements. Under such a western policy, Saudi Arabia gained a very high status. Under the name of Islam, Saudis and the other oil kingdoms openly supported the anti-Third world and anti-Muslim policies of the West. It is one of the greatest tragedies that a country which considers itself as the pioneer and center of Islam, had the closest alliance with the country which the vast majority of Muslims of the world consider their biggest enemy.

Many Muslims started seeing through this hypocrisy and charade. Many Muslims have now changed their attitude towards the secular and tolerant forces in Islam. A vast majority of Muslims want to join in the struggle of the other Third world countries and other oppressed people of the world for a more equal, just, and fair world. Many Muslims have started seeing the struggle for a new world order based upon mutual respect, equality, and justice as compatible with the message of a great religion like Islam. The arrogant and super-rich oil kingdoms have very little in common with the real message of Islam.

Dr. Sawraj Singh, MD F.I.C.S. is the Chairman of the Washington State Network for Human Rights and Chairman of the Central Washington Coalition for Social Justice. He can be reached at sawrajsingh@hotmail.com.

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