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Surrey Mayoral Poll Of 507 Online People Which Doesn’t Include Rasode Doesn’t Really Say Much

Poll Has Doug McCallum Ahead Of Hepner But Is Meaningless Without Rasode!

Former Surrey mayor Doug McCallum’s issue of neighbourhood wards resonated among those polled, with 53 per cent saying it was a “very good” or “good” idea.

SURREY – A recent online poll of 507 people, which didn’t include Surrey councilor and third mayoral candidate Barinder Rasode, had former Surrey mayor Doug McCallum leading but is virtually useless as it doesn’t really give any kind of picture other than that McCallum has more name recognition than Surrey First’s Linda Hepner, who shot herself in the foot from the start with her childish ferris wheel idea in a city that has become the murder capital of BC.

Vancouver-based Insights West conducted the online poll of 507 people aged 18 and over from July 17 to 21.

And for some reason they only chose the officially declared candidates for mayor – McCallum and Hepner  – while not putting into the mix Rasode who is already on record as saying that she is running for mayor.

Her omission made the results pretty well useless as that is not a reality-based outcome , which nonetheless, had McCallum leads in name recognition with 83 per cent to Hepner’s 67 per cent.

Both so-called declared candidates were recognized well among voters 55 years old and over – McCallum at 96 per cent and Hepner at 81 per cent.

McCallum leads Hepner by 19 per cent among those aged 18 to 34 (64 per cent and 46 per cent, respectively).

Among those who know McCallum, 40 per cent say they are “very likely” or “moderately likely” to vote for him as mayor this fall. Hepner was just behind with 37 per cent likely to vote for her.

McCallum’s issue of neighbourhood wards resonated among those polled, with 53 per cent saying it was a “very good” or “good” idea.

Reacting to Hepner’s statement in a Surrey Leader newspaper story, people were not in favour of her call for a ferris wheel at the south end of the Pattullo Bridge.

Of those asked, it was deemed a “bad” or “very bad” idea by 72 per cent of respondents.

Crime was listed as the most important issue by respondents at 45 per cent, followed distantly by transportation at 21 per cent, poverty at 10 per cent and economic development at eight per cent.

The poll has a margin of error of plus or minus 4.4 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

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