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A New World Order Emerges From Group Of 20 Meetings In Germany

By Bhupinder S. Liddar

A new world order emerged at the Group of 20 (G20) world leaders meeting in Hamburg, last week.  G20 represents two-thirds of the world’s population and all industrialized major economies. Three countries – Germany, France and Canada, led by progressive-minded leaders, assumed moral leadership of the free world and will now attempt to chart the world events course. Needless to say, Russia and USA will continue to flex military muscle, and the latter remains an economic might to contend with on world stage.

President Donald Trump voluntarily withdrew the United States from a number of agendas items being pursued by world leaders, including tackling effects of climate change and pursuing free trade agreements. Syria and Nicaragua are the only other two countries which have not signed the Paris agreement on climate change and others in G20 still remain enthusiastic about promoting free trade.

French President Emmanuel Macron has already announced convening a summit in December in Paris on climate change and Germany’s Angela Merkel, who chaired the G20 summit, emerged as a responsible and trusted leader to manage world affairs.

Trump’s 20-minute bilateral meeting with his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin extended to over two hours – a good sign!

China will continue to steadily but actively enhance its economic and military capabilities, as it steps up the ladder in its desire to become world leader. Japan, India and the US will continue to develop closer relations to contain and challenge Chinese expansionist moves.

Xenophobia gripped Britain is busy navel gazing following Brexit referendum’s clear signal for it to exit European Union single market of 28 nations with a population of over 500 million. Britain is trying to sort out many things on various fronts, including how to disengage and at what cost from Europe, Scottish independence, immigration, terrorism attacks and the Conservative Party trying to stay in power, having blown away its majority in the unnecessary recent election.

Australia, Japan, Mexico and South Korea, will continue to pay attention to their economies and stay the course, charted by their allies, which thus far has served them well.

India will continue to struggle to impress the world of its economic prowess, while facing challenges on the domestic front and is struggling in its bid to form reliable and trusting alliances with western world.

Canada’s Prime Minister Justin Trudeau had a bilateral meeting with his Indian counterpart, Narendra Modi, following which Modi tweeted: “India and Canada is an ace partnership, advantageous to both nations, beneficial for the world. Game, set and match.”  Modi may already have secured an invitation to visit Canada and Trudeau was probably invited to visit India. Such visits will work only to enhance Liberal Party’s electoral fortunes because there is hardly any tangible cooperation agenda on the bilateral horizon. Former Prime Minister Stephen Harper expended considerable energy and resources, including a visit to India, but failed to achieve a free trade agreement between the two countries.

Brazil is a major player on the South American continent but its preoccupation with domestic political challenges is hampering it to make any significant contribution to the evolving world order.

Argentina, Indonesia, Italy, Saudi Arabia, Spain (a permanent guest at G20), and South Africa will continue to trudge along with nothing new, different or dynamic to offer to help chart a new course. However, Turkey remains a wild card!

Saudi Arabia, the only Arab country in the G20 and South Africa, the only African country in the group are preoccupied with regional and domestic issues, respectively. South Africa is facing massive economic challenges, especially with slowdown in mining sector and continuing corruption charges against President Jacob Zuma, from within his party. South Africa’s pre-occupation with domestic political shenanigans, has rendered it impotent to play any constructive role on the African continent.

Canadian Trudeau and French Macron’s political tango will likely pick up in step as the two of same vintage and of similar viewpoints on major world issues work together with another congenial and like-minded colleague, Germany’s Angela Merkel to define a new world order!

Bhupinder S. Liddar, is a retired Canadian diplomat and former editor/publisher of “Diplomat & International Canada” magazine.

A New World Order Emerges From Group Of 20 Meetings In Germany

By Bhupinder S. Liddar

A new world order emerged at the Group of 20 (G20) world leaders meeting in Hamburg, last week.  G20 represents two-thirds of the world’s population and all industrialized major economies. Three countries – Germany, France and Canada, led by progressive-minded leaders, assumed moral leadership of the free world and will now attempt to chart the world events course. Needless to say, Russia and USA will continue to flex military muscle, and the latter remains an economic might to contend with on world stage.

President Donald Trump voluntarily withdrew the United States from a number of agendas items being pursued by world leaders, including tackling effects of climate change and pursuing free trade agreements. Syria and Nicaragua are the only other two countries which have not signed the Paris agreement on climate change and others in G20 still remain enthusiastic about promoting free trade.

French President Emmanuel Macron has already announced convening a summit in December in Paris on climate change and Germany’s Angela Merkel, who chaired the G20 summit, emerged as a responsible and trusted leader to manage world affairs.

Trump’s 20-minute bilateral meeting with his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin extended to over two hours – a good sign!

China will continue to steadily but actively enhance its economic and military capabilities, as it steps up the ladder in its desire to become world leader. Japan, India and the US will continue to develop closer relations to contain and challenge Chinese expansionist moves.

Xenophobia gripped Britain is busy navel gazing following Brexit referendum’s clear signal for it to exit European Union single market of 28 nations with a population of over 500 million. Britain is trying to sort out many things on various fronts, including how to disengage and at what cost from Europe, Scottish independence, immigration, terrorism attacks and the Conservative Party trying to stay in power, having blown away its majority in the unnecessary recent election.

Australia, Japan, Mexico and South Korea, will continue to pay attention to their economies and stay the course, charted by their allies, which thus far has served them well.

India will continue to struggle to impress the world of its economic prowess, while facing challenges on the domestic front and is struggling in its bid to form reliable and trusting alliances with western world.

Canada’s Prime Minister Justin Trudeau had a bilateral meeting with his Indian counterpart, Narendra Modi, following which Modi tweeted: “India and Canada is an ace partnership, advantageous to both nations, beneficial for the world. Game, set and match.”  Modi may already have secured an invitation to visit Canada and Trudeau was probably invited to visit India. Such visits will work only to enhance Liberal Party’s electoral fortunes because there is hardly any tangible cooperation agenda on the bilateral horizon. Former Prime Minister Stephen Harper expended considerable energy and resources, including a visit to India, but failed to achieve a free trade agreement between the two countries.

Brazil is a major player on the South American continent but its preoccupation with domestic political challenges is hampering it to make any significant contribution to the evolving world order.

Argentina, Indonesia, Italy, Saudi Arabia, Spain (a permanent guest at G20), and South Africa will continue to trudge along with nothing new, different or dynamic to offer to help chart a new course. However, Turkey remains a wild card!

Saudi Arabia, the only Arab country in the G20 and South Africa, the only African country in the group are preoccupied with regional and domestic issues, respectively. South Africa is facing massive economic challenges, especially with slowdown in mining sector and continuing corruption charges against President Jacob Zuma, from within his party. South Africa’s pre-occupation with domestic political shenanigans, has rendered it impotent to play any constructive role on the African continent.

Canadian Trudeau and French Macron’s political tango will likely pick up in step as the two of same vintage and of similar viewpoints on major world issues work together with another congenial and like-minded colleague, Germany’s Angela Merkel to define a new world order!

Bhupinder S. Liddar, is a retired Canadian diplomat and former editor/publisher of “Diplomat & International Canada” magazine.

 

 

 

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