|

National Police Federation Continues To Demand Clarity On Proposed Surrey Police Transition

The National Police Federation (NPF) argues Surrey’s proposed police transition would reduce the number of police officers in Surrey: giving people less for more, as taxpayers would be burdened with unexpected and growing costs related to the transition. Funding the plan has also resulted in the cancellation of several long-awaited and promised projects and services that would have benefited residents of Surrey including a new YMCA in Surrey City Centre, and the closure of Community Centres.

By PD Raj – Senior Writer DESIBUZZCanada

SURREY, BC – The National Police Federation (NPF) held a Media Roundtable discussion in Surrey Monday morning where it reaffirmed its commitment to continuing its efforts to expose the lack of consultation, clarity and costing when it comes to the proposed Surrey police transition.

The roundtable featured Brian Sauvé, President, and Trevor Dinwoodie, Regional Director, who met with reporters on Monday to answer questions about the costly transition plan.

“A plan that fails to consult community organizations, ignores the growing concerns of residents, and doesn’t include transparent direct and indirect costing isn’t worth the paper it’s printed on,” said Sauvé.“Surrey residents want to see continued improvements to public safety, not more costs and less service delivered with a new badge.”

Surrey’s proposed police transition would reduce the number of police officers in Surrey: giving people less for more, as taxpayers would be burdened with unexpected and growing costs related to the transition. Funding the plan has also resulted in the cancellation of several long-awaited and promised projects and services that would have benefited residents of Surrey including a new YMCA in Surrey City Centre, and the closure of Community Centres.

The Surrey RCMP has helped drive a significant decline in crime rates to what is now a ten-year low, while many of Canada’s other large cities, including Vancouver, Halifax, or Calgary, have experienced increased crime.

“It is now the responsibility of the newly appointed Surrey Police Board to answer the demands by Surrey residents for greater engagement, transparency and accountability,” added Sauvé. “Everyone expects them to answer the questions that the City of Surrey has refused to answer.”“Just last week, Premier John Horgan told Richard Zussman during a Facebook Live interview that the transition is nowhere near done,” added Sauvé. “We are going to keep fighting to make sure that Surrey residents are heard, and that public safety is put first.”

About the National Police Federation:

The National Police Federation (NPF) was certified to represent ~20,000 RCMP members serving across Canada and internationally in the summer of 2019. The NPF is the largest police labour relations organization in Canada, the second largest in North America and is the first independent national association to represent RCMP Members. The NPF will focus on improving public safety in Canada by negotiating the first-ever Collective Agreement for RCMP officers, and on increasing resources, equipment, training and supports for our Members who have been under-funded for far too long. Better resourcing and support for the RCMP will enhance community safety and livability in the communities we serve, large and small, all across Canada.

Comments are closed