After Stirring Up Election Hornet – Premier Clark Runs And Hides Fearing Massive Defeat

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NDP Leader Dix Says Premier Backtracking For Only One Reason – Terrible Poll Numbers!

“I think two-and-a-half-years in government as an unelected premier is an awful long time,” Premier Christy Clark said in Victoria last December. But now the unelected Premier has had a change of hear and she has stopped banging the election drums because her BC Liberal party’s numbers tanked way below of what the NDP polled recently. Despite Clark’s backtracking, she will have to call the election sooner than later because as an “unelected premier” she can’t sit in office for two years without a mandate.

By R. Paul Dhillon With News Files

VANCOUVER – Unelected Premier Christy Clark had been loudly banging the election drums leading up to the HST defeat last Friday but that was before her and her BC Liberal party’s numbers tanked way below of what the NDP polled and more troubling for her and hapless party – the upstart BC Conservatives led by former federal Tory MP John Cummins are eating away the core BC Liberal support and most likely putting the entire BC Liberal party out to pasture if an election was to be held this fall.

Clark, a.k.a. the “Barbie Premier” who has not only been ineffective but also incredibly incompetent in her short time at the helm of the BC Liberals, finally ended the election speculation she deliberately cultivated from the moment she won the Liberal leadership by saying that she will stick to the May 2013 fixed election timeline.

NDP leader Adrian Dix was quick to point out that Clark made this decision for one reason and one reason only: she has concluded from her own polling she cannot win an election at this time.

“The Premier and the Liberal Party put their political interests first throughout this process,” Dix said. “They have avoided dealing with the substantial problems facing B.C. while the Premier prepared her election plan.”

Dix said while the Liberal government floundered, the New Democrat Official Opposition caucus united around a positive agenda of change.

“Over the past months, we have made positive proposals, held the government to account and prepared for the possibility of an election campaign. And as a result of the election speculation, we put together an excellent team of candidates — the best our party has fielded in many years,” he said

“And despite being outspent by a massive margin by the Liberals using taxpayer dollars and their political allies, we won the HST referendum. The people of B.C. have been responding positively to the message of the NDP and our agenda for positive change.”

Dix said the Liberals have floundered under confused leadership and the absence of an agenda beyond salvaging the HST.

“This is a government that is out of gas and out of ideas,” he said.

Despite Clark’s backtracking on elections, she will have to call the election sooner than later because as an “unelected premier” she can’t sit in office for two years without a mandate.

During the leadership campaign, Clark suggested she wouldn’t have a mandate without heading to the polls early.

“I think two-and-a-half-years in government as an unelected premier is an awful long time,” Clark said in Victoria last December.

“I think British Columbians might be right to say, by the time 2013 rolls around … ‘We want to get a chance to vote for you under the basic principles of democracy.”’

“She said that she didn’t think she had a mandate to be premier, now she says she does have a mandate to be premier. … I don’t think anyone seriously thinks that there was any other consideration by the premier. It certainly wasn’t the public interest,” Dix said.

The announcement comes less than a week after Clark’s government suffered a humiliating defeat in a mail-in referendum on the harmonized sales tax, reported the Canadian Press.

The HST was brought in by Clark’s predecessor just weeks after the 2009 provincial election, in which the Liberals explicitly said they weren’t contemplating a harmonized tax. The HST combined the seven per cent provincial sales tax and the five per cent federal goods and services tax into a single levy, which in turn raised the cost of items that were previously exempt from the PST.

The announcement prompted a grassroots citizen democracy campaign that forced the government to call a referendum.

Clark attempted to sway angry voters by promising to lower the tax to 10 per cent, rather than 12, but it went down in defeat with 55 per cent voting to scrap it.

Immediately after the result, Clark still refused to close the door on an election, but pundits were already musing that the referendum results had shut it for her.

Dix noted the premier is promising to introduce a job-creation plan soon — something the NDP leader says she should have done long ago.