Kenney Blames Staffers For “Fake Citizenship Ceremony”, Refuses To Take Responsibility

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When a bureaucrat sent Sun News a list of possible citizenship ceremonies to cover in Ontario, a network employee suggested another scenario. “Let’s do it. We can fake the Oath,” reads an email from a (at)sunmedia.ca email address, the name blacked out of the document.

OTTAWA – Loud mouth immigration minister Jason Kenney refused to take responsibility and personally apologize for a fake citizenship ceremony crafted by his office for the rightwing television network Sun TV.

Six federal bureaucrats were drafted to pose as new Canadians for a citizenship reaffirmation ceremony broadcast on the Sun News network, an event requested by Kenney’s office, reported Canadian Press.

The bureaucrats smiled and held Canadian flags as the TV hosts referred to a group of 10 people as “new Canadians” that had “finally” received their citizenship.

Although Kenney’s office apologized on the air to Sun News on Thursday morning, placing the blame squarely on the shoulders of bureaucrats at Citizenship and Immigration Canada, but under heat from the House of Commons – Kenney himself would take no responsibility despite admitting that it was wrong to hold a fraud ceremony.

Sun News host Pat Bolland said the fact some of the people he presented in the studio last October were not actually new Canadians was “completely unknown to us.”

“It would seem that both of us have a little egg on our face,” Mr. Bolland said to Mr. Kenney’s spokeswoman Candice Malcolm.

Documents released to The Canadian Press under access-to-information legislation show that just a few weeks before Canada’s Citizenship Week last October, Kenney’s staff directed departmental officials to add a last-minute citizenship ceremony at the network to their list of scheduled events.

Bureaucrats scrambled to work out the logistics, suggesting to the minister’s office that Sun News could cover one of the 13 scheduled ceremonies in Ontario — four of them in Toronto, including one at the Air Canada Centre.

One senior bureaucrat at the registrar of Canadian citizenship expressed concern to Kenney’s office that Sun News seemed to want to feature “only” the oath, which might short-change new Canadians from the full ceremony experience.

“We have to keep in mind that the ceremony should first and foremost be a special (sic) for the new citizen, most of whom will want family and friends (sic) attend this very special day in their lives,” the bureaucrat wrote.

When a bureaucrat sent Sun News a list of possible citizenship ceremonies to cover in Ontario, a network employee suggested another scenario.

“Let’s do it. We can fake the Oath,” reads an email from a (at)sunmedia.ca email address, the name blacked out of the document.

Neither Bolland nor Sun News’ parent company Quebecor Inc. has addressed the comment made in the email.